Parenting 2.0

Posts Tagged ‘breastfeeding


Despite all my qualms about breastfeeding, after 10 months it seems to have come to a natural end for me and Niko. Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy I nursed him and it worked out really well for us, but our time is over. I had planned to breastfeed for one year, but over the past few weeks it seems to have just naturally tapered off. I didn’t really feel like I was producing enough milk and little Niko was often frustrated during and after feeding, so I introduced more bottle feedings and he seemed more content and satisfied.

Another sign that it was the end for this little guy? Even though we’ve been tapering off, sometimes I still try nursing him when he seems fussy and I don’t have a bottle on hand. (And let’s face it, breastfeeding is more convenient than preparing a bottle.) When we gave it whirl yesterday he went for it, for all of about 10 seconds, then stopped, looked up at me and started giggling, showing off his six white and ever growing teeth. (And trust me, the fact that those chompers are in there doesn’t make it any easier either. Let’s just say I’ve bared the brunt of a few bites.)  Anyway after the bout of giggles, he pulled himself away and focused his attention elsewhere. Yah, I think that’s pretty much a sign that he’s done. I’m done. It’s over, but also the beginning of a new era as well. After all aren’t all endings just the beginning of something else anyway?

Click to support my blog


*Breastfeeding Survey* It’s anonymous and takes only a second. (See survey at the bottom of this post.) Thanks!

“Breast is Best”! This message is in your face as a new mother, and there’s a lot of pressure to breastfeed. I was actually surprised to find out that my grandmother who had five kids didn’t breastfeed a single one of them. She told me this when we visited her this winter. I just sort of assumed that most people breastfed back in those days. But she went on to say that it just wasn’t popular, and actually it was the poorer people who breastfed because they couldn’t afford formula. Wow. Times certainly have changed. I mean it’s just so trendy now! Maybe too trendy?

I know there are lots of benefits to breastfeeding and I am breastfeeding, but I have seen friends who for whatever reason formula fed their babies and some of them were made to feel guilty – be it by nurses, or self-inflicted or societal pressures. But you know what? All those babies from back in the day when breastfeeding was on the outs, are OK! I mean look at my mom and her brothers and sisters – none of them were breastfed and they all lived to tell the tale.

What I’m wondering is, how long will I continue to breastfeed? I mean the Little N Man has two teeth now, and thankfully as of yet they haven’t inflicted any damage. But how much longer will we go on like this? Ontario Public Health nurses recommend breastfeeding for six months, and he’s almost seven. But still there seems to be this societal pressure to keep going – to forge forward until pre-school. OK that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but I do here of it. And to be honest I’m sort of torn. I like breastfeeding him – it’s convenient, it’s bonding and it’s free. But, that means he also relies on my physical presence to eat. Maybe that’s not such a bad thing. I’m just curious about other mothers. Did you breastfeed or not? And if you did, for how long?


Now that  I have been a mommy for close to five months, I have honed quite a few taking-care-of-baby skills: changing diapers, getting up in the wee hours of the night, entertaining a newborn, and (drum roll, please…) breastfeeding in public! Although I can’t say for certain I’ve honed this skill to perfection, I have done it and met with success and am sure I will do it again in the future.

Is the public arena my place of choice to feed little Niko? No.

Have I developed a comfort and skill level that allow me to feed my baby when he’s hungry out in public? Yes.

And, truth be told, most of this comfort developed on the recent trip Niko and I took to Halifax, where airports and airplanes became ground for free-range feeding! Being discreet helped a lot with building up my level of comfort: I mean a lot of times I don’t think that anyone was even aware of what I was doing, that is unless they took note of the big pink, Babe au Lait nursing canopy draped over my front. But seeing as most people are so wrapped up in their own business, I find they for the most part don’t even look at others, as I will explain later…

Interestingly enough, in the March 2010 issue of Today’s Parent there is an article (p. 107-108) about Breastfeeding in Public. The writers are all for it, despite the qualms that nursing mothers may have about this task. The most important thing is to get that hungry baby fed, right? And I agree with the article – hungry babes do need to eat, and when the time comes, they pretty much need to eat pronto! The article goes on to give tips to mothers who breastfeed in public, and one of them is as follows: “Smile at people. Make eye contact. Look confident.” OK, looking confident is one thing, but smiling and making eye contact?! Come on! It’s not like I am looking to make new friends while I am nursing my baby. I mean people out and about in the general public barely even look each other in the eye – so yes I would feel a bit awkward sitting on a bench in the mall, breastfeeding my baby, while giving the old wink and smile to passersby! Confidence – YES! Smiling and eye contact – WEIRD!

Note: Like Greg mentioned in his comment, I’ll just “have to take what ‘they’ say with a large grain of sea salt”.


Is there really any better way to spend a birthday than practicing NIP (nursing in public)? My how things change once you have a baby… My friend Heather knows NIP is a concern (perhaps verging on phobia) of mine and suggested we go out for lunch today with our babies, sit in a booth, bite the bullet, and give it some practice.  She has been on a few road trips since the birth of her daughter, and has become what I would call a pro.  Me on the other hand, well I could use some guidance on being a discreet NIPper.  In talking with her and some other friends, I’ve come to realize it’s all in how your place your Pashmina (or burping blanket), really.  Although some would say: “Forget the Pashmina! I am feeding my kid and what is more natural than that? There is no need to take cover”.  But for modesty’s sake and my own sanity, I think I will go the route of the Pashmina, thank you very much!

And now that the day is done, I can type with confidence and say the NIP excursion was a success (not to mention that I was treated to a birthday lunch as well :)).  Perhaps the empty restaurant and booth we were sitting in were both encouraging factors, but Niko and I did it, and did it proudly (and modestly)! Yah for that!


In the early days, when Niko was first born, he was having some issues with breastfeeding.  Seeing as he was in the NICU, we were seeing a lactation consultant to help us get going.  One day the lactation consultant felt around in his mouth, and afterward suggested that we get his tongue snipped. Snipped?! I had no idea what she was talking about! She went on to explain that she thought he had a tongue-tie or tethered tongue and that this was impeding his ability to breastfeed.  I had never heard of such a thing and inquired a bit more.  She told me it was a simple procedure done at the doctor’s office, where the tie that is under the tongue, that connects to the base of the mouth is simply snipped so that his tongue can latch easier when nursing.  This sounded a bit barbaric to me, but she told me it really doesn’t hurt the baby, and that there is no freezing needed: the doctor just goes in with the clippers and does the trick. Ouch! (That was all I could think at the time.)

She also told me that having a tongue-tie can hinder speech development in the future.  This got me thinking, so I talked to my doctor about it and she was leaning toward NOT getting the snip.  She said it used to be really common, but not so much anymore, and that a lot of times, newborns’ tongues will stretch as they grow and they will therefore grow out of not being able to latch.  My doctor further went on to feel his tongue-tie and did not think it was a concern.  After talking with Borys, we decided not to get the snip.

Over the past couple of weeks, Niko has been sticking out his tongue a lot.  Sometimes when we stick ours out at him, he will mirror this back, with a smile! And, he just sticks it out on his own as well, for no apparent reason.  I can’t help but wonder: is he just trying to prove, “See Mom and Dad, I didn’t need to get that nasty little snip! Look at me, I can stick my tongue out like the best of them!”.


Niko has been looking forward to his friend Talia’s first birthday party all week! She turned one a few days ago, but her big bash was today.  Although Niko was looking forward to partying with her, his “on demand” schedule had other plans.  The party started at 12:30pm, and just as we were getting ready to leave his crying started: translated into proper English this crying meant “Mommy, feed me!”.  So, an hour, a full tummy and a fresh diaper later we were on our way.

Now, seeing as we were going to a baby’s birthday party there were lots of kids and parents there.  We apologized for being late, and they all understood.  My only worry was: what if Niko gets hungry at the party? Where will I feed him? (We brought a bottle just in case.) In talking with two other moms at the party, I realized we all have this similar sense of being uncomfortable just breastfeeding openly at parties, and it was a relief to know that I was not the only mom feeling this way.  Inevitably, as time passed, the “Mommy, feed me!” cries started again.  But there was no need to break out the bottle; we just went upstairs to the computer room, took our time in the peace and quiet and listened to Happy Birthday being sung from downstairs.  The only minor interruption came from some older kids who were playing hide-and-seek and barged in looking for a place to hide – of course what they found was something entirely different!

Note: In the picture below you can see Talia – the birthday girl -poised to give Niko what I can only assume is a birthday love tap.

Talia 2

Talia 1


As I have mentioned before, being on maternity allows me the opportunity to indulge my addictive personality in the form of getting hooked on many new TV shows.  We upgraded our cable to Rogers on Demand which affords me, the viewer, the ability to watch (and become addicted to) many shows according to when it suits my schedule.  Since right now my schedule involves breastfeeding around the clock, Rogers on Demand has become my new BFF (best friend forever).  That said, this has inspired me to try Feeding on Demand; I jest, this is not the reason I am trying feeding on demand, I just liked the segue it provided.

Note: I just learned how to spell segue. I had tried “segway”, but it came up as a typo. Just another example of how easy the English language is to learn.

So, today is the first day that Niko and I are experimenting with feeding on demand.  When Niko was first born my lactation consultant told me to get eight feeds in a day; the only way this was feasible was by waking him up every two to three hours.  All in all, I liked waking him up as I could control the schedule, and knew exactly when he was going to eat.  Upon graduating from lactation school the consultant sent us on our merry way and told us we were ready for feeding on demand – which basically means I would feed him when he wakes up on his own; that is, when he wakes up crying it means it’s time for him to eat. This was just over four weeks ago.  Although she, and the public health nurse both told me to go for it, I have stuck with waking him up every two to three hours to ensure he is getting his eight feeds in and continues to gain weight.  However, over the last few days I have noticed that he is not as hungry when I wake him up.

We already do feeding on demand in the night and he usually goes to bed around midnight then wakes on his own at 3 or 4 am and then again sometime between 7 and 8 am.  This said, today we are trying feeding on demand during my waking hours.  As time ticks by, I wonder…when is this little munchkin going to wake up? His last feeding was at 7:30 am and it is currently 11:15: tick tock, tick tock, and I wait… If he doesn’t wake up by 11:30, I am going to go in there and pinch him or something. Well that might be a little cruel, but I think I will wake him and feed him.  Does that still count as feeding on demand? Probably not.

Baby


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 355 other followers

Like this blog? Vote for it! Just click on the brown box below for one vote. Thanks!

Top Mommy Blogs - Mom Blog Directory

Categories

Alli & Baby Niko

Top Rated